Tag Archives: creativity

Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

Now, anyone who knows me knows I hate dirty hippies. But this is pretty frickin’ rad and super inspiring.

Lindy hop needs more inspirational and share-able videos like this one, who’s on it?

 

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Finding Limits Limitless

Andrew had an awesome comment last week:

“Being open minded is important and I agree with you on the point that it is always a good endeavor to expand ones horizons.

People have suggested though (and I agree) in certain situations sometimes being creative comes easier when one has limitations to work within.

My question would be how does one find balance among these two ideas? I feel if you choose one exclusively you end up with the extreme of the dancer that just looks like a caricature of the person or idea they are trying to emulate or on the other hand a person who goes on all these tangents that lack context.”

This is an idea I’ve also been thinking about for a long time.

One of my absolute favorite movies is Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window (1954). When I first saw this movie I was so intrigued by how the movie is filmed. It stand out from all of Hitchcock’s other films. Why? Because pretty much the whole film is shot from the window of the lead character’s apartment. The lead character is in a wheelchair, because he broke his leg, and he spends all his time looking out into the other apartments from his own window. Hitchcock put a limit on himself by only shooting from one point of view. Of course it was much harder to do, and obviously doesn’t have these incredible long shots (like in North by Northwest (1959)), however this forced Hitch to be much more creative in his filming and in the end delivered the emotions to the audience that the story called for perfectly.

Okay so done with the film-nerd-dom, but that the heck does that all mean to Lindy Hoppers?

So a while back Jerry posted this incredible interview with Skye Humphries (who will be teaching in Pasadena next weekend at Harvest Moon Swingout, come out and dance with him because he’s never on the west coast!) in which Skye talks about structure in Lindy Hop:

“I think the great appeal of Lindy Hop is not it’s lack of right and wrong, but instead is this simplicity of structure.  By having [a] clear structure the dance allows [for] great improvisation and communication.

Improvisation isn’t about doing away without all rules or all structures or all forms.  It is about subverting those rules, reworking the structures from the inside, allowing one’s self to fill the form of the dance and then refashioning it.  Improvisation comes from mastery of structure not its dissolution, and this is one of the real beauties of Lindy Hop.  Its form is an incredible achievement.  Its basic step is a complex negotiation between the couple and the individual.  It leaves so much space.

To me the only mistake is to approach Lindy Hop as formless or structure-less [by] ignoring the rhythm, ignoring ones partner, ignoring the music, [or] ignoring how the dance has been done in the past.”

We can think about the swing out as a limit. Lindy Hop is also a limit, why do you chose Lindy Hop above ballroom, or hip hop, or modern? For me, there are an enormous amount of reasons, but the main one is perhaps this simple structure that if both partners understand thoroughly they can create something that is bigger than the sum of it’s parts. They can create a dance that could not have been created by any one dancer alone. I believe that no other dance out there can offer this. (If you disagree, challenge me!)

In last weeks post I asked you all to open your mind and find music that you liked that was not something you would dance to. The important part of that was not to listen to every song out there and say that you liked it, but listen to songs that you like. It’s to find or create your own simple structure to be inspired from. You may as well find that you don’t like anything else except for Cats and the Fiddle, but make sure that you know why.

To answer Andrew, I do not think that being open minded and having limits are two different ends of one stick. I think you cannot have one without the other. Being open minded helps you understand your limits, or this structure to an incredible degree. It helps you question why this structure works and why it works so well for you.

I think in the end it’s important to keep an open mind and be receptive to all ideas around you, however it is also equally important to develop your own taste, your own point of view, and your ability to think critically.

See you next week!

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Music Variety is the Spice of Life

I’m back. Things have slightly settled in my life for the moment and I have time for blogging again! I’m challenging myself to post once a week. You can help keep me honest by spamming me with hate mail or lovely comments.

So onto the meat and potatoes.

When I first started dancing, maybe for the first year or two, I went into this “I LOVE LINDY HOP SO MUCH!OMFG!!” spiral and ended up only listening to swing music. It definitely made me a better dancer and helped me a lot to define what I liked and didn’t like dancing to. But it also made me a more boring person and therefore a more boring dancer.

When we put ourselves in boxes or align ourselves with only one way of thinking about something we put limits on our thoughts and therefore our actions. It’s so important to be open minded, but it’s also very difficult.

So I give you this little challenge for the week, listen to music you loved in high school. I suggest getting Spotify. You can find every song on there (even ones you never bought on CD, or tape, or… whatever else I’m to young to know about) and have a little nostalgia party with your self. It’s amazing how much our tastes change yet stay the same. I challenge you to discover and explore the music that you might have forgotten about. You gain a new appreciation for your own taste in music. If you want to dive further: look up sound tracks to movies you love, find friend’s playlists with Spotify Social and see what they are listening to, type in random words in the search and listen to the first song you think looks interesting.

Expand your mind, and you’ll find your ability expands as well.

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Thinking About Creativity

Sometimes it’s hard to be creative.  Sometimes it’s easy.

But what does it mean to be truly creative? Can you be creative while doing someone else’s choreography? Is it creative to practice or learn the Shim Sham, the Big Apple, the Trankey Doo, etc.? Is it more creative to have confines and limitation? Or is it more creative to have a blank slate? And how does this all fit in to Lindy Hop?

I’ve been thinking about creativity and what it means to me recently so I was wondering what it means to all of you out there.

Check out the following posts for more brain stirring:

What are all your ideas?

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